Don’t Despair, Be Aware

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Don’t Despair, Be Aware

The pink ribbon is the icon for breast cancer and breast cancer treatment.

The pink ribbon is the icon for breast cancer and breast cancer treatment.

nmarques74

The pink ribbon is the icon for breast cancer and breast cancer treatment.

nmarques74

nmarques74

The pink ribbon is the icon for breast cancer and breast cancer treatment.

Storm Taylor, Editor

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Do you know someone with breast cancer?

  • Yes (100%, 2 Votes)
  • No (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 2

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Breast cancer touches the lives of women all over the United States. One in eight women develops invasive breast cancer at some time in her life (cancer.org). It is projected that in 2013 there will be 232,340 new cases of breast cancer and 39,620 breast cancer deaths (komen.org). This is not a trifling matter.

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM) was founded in 1985 in order to promote research and education to an otherwise uninterested culture.

Since then, the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) has used National Breast Cancer Awareness Month to advocate breast diagnostic services and provide support to women and families impacted by breast cancer.

“According to The National Cancer institute (NCI), getting a high-quality mammogram and having a clinical breast exam on a regular basis are the most effective ways to detect breast cancer early… However, with increased healthcare costs and a rapidly increasing percentage of uninsured women, many simply cannot afford the cost of screening tests. These women are at a significantly higher risk of dying from breast cancer if later diagnosed.   That’s why NBCF provides free mammograms to women in all 50 states through our network of hospitals,” states the NBCF website.

The NBCF has taken measures to reach out to as many people as possible via social media. The NBCF uses YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook, an online support forum, a blog, and various events and fundraisers to support their cause.

“Hearing the words, you have cancer is super scary, your life changes in an instant. With the huge support from my family, friends, colleagues, and my rock of a husband – Sam, I got through the most challenging nine months of my life. I was fortunate enough to be able to continue work, which gave me some kind of normality. I lost my hair and eyebrows, which was an experience in itself,” breast cancer survivor Alison shared on the NBCF’s blog.

Mrs. Powell, a Bob Jones English teacher, is currently experiencing cancer in her life as she helps her mom cope with a breast cancer remission. “What a roller coaster ride,” she commented.

An excess in estrogen caused her mom’s breast cancer. The medication given to help balance her estrogen levels was actually a factor in the cancer itself. When asked if she knew anything about breast cancer before her mom’s diagnosis, Mrs. Powell responded that her aunt also had breast cancer. “It was a much more aggressive form of cancer. Sadly, she didn’t make it.”

National  Breast Cancer Awareness Month is the time to acknowledge this problem and the people who struggle with it.  In the local community and abroad, many women are suffering from breast cancer; but these women aren’t the only ones who suffer. The families and friends of those with cancer feel deep pain for their loved one. October is the time to reach out to people you know who are afflicted with cancer in their life. Take time to visit the NBCA website in order to educate yourself about breast cancer and find ways you can help support women in need.

Visit the NBCA website here.

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