#Calexit: The Nation of California?

Back to Article
Back to Article

#Calexit: The Nation of California?

Zachary Johnson, Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Independence movements are unheard of in modern America. The last time a state seriously contemplated independence was Texas in 2009, when Governor Rick Perry hinted at an independence referendum, causing the crowd to chant, “secede, secede.” To most, succession seems radical and old-fashioned. However, could one of the most new-age and relaxed states seek independence from the Union?

CaliforniaYes, a movement for the succession and independence of the 31st state, announced that a referendum will be held in the spring of 2019 which will decide the international status of California. The campaign argues that its outranking Poland in population and outranking Russia and Italy in GDP should grant it independence. YesCalifornia reasons that if given nation status, they could reform and rebuild their schools, revamp their infrastructure, drastically increase trade once freed from American trade regulations, have greater power over their elections, and change immigration laws. The movement also claims that California loses as much as 16 billion dollars per year due to government subsidizing. An independent California would, according to its founder, use the US Dollar, seek UN membership, sport its own Olympic team, and continue Medicaid.

The idea of an independent California has gained traction with millions of Californians- even the elite of Silicon Valley. Everyone from social media founders, design software engineers, and Hyperloop supporters to Uber investors support a referendum, and some even offered to help pave the ground and pay for efforts for an independent California.

California’s independence would bring radical changes to the United States. If the state succeeded, the US would lose nearly 15% of its GDP, 12% of its population, and 55 electoral votes which have proven crucial in countless US elections. An independent California could also inspire more independence movements, such as those in Texas. This could even harm states like Hawai’i and Alaska, since much of their trade from the lower 48 leaves from Oakland and other California port cities.

But is independence viable? Many find an independent California to be outrageous and hypocritical, claiming that a Texan independence was quickly shut down and ridiculed by the rest of the country, but a Californian independence movement is seen as noble and welcome. Some critics argue that California could not remain independent for long, citing their water crisis and massive amount of debt relative to their GDP. However, YesCalifornia claims that their debt is blown out of proportion, though serious, but can be handled due to its minimal percentage of their GDP.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email